Friday, January 5, 2018

Trading Holidays for the calendar year 2018

Trading Holidays for the calendar year 2018 : Equities
·        
Sr. No.
Date
Day
Description
1
26-Jan-2018
Friday
Republic Day
2
13-Feb-2018
Tuesday
Mahashivratri
3
02-Mar-2018
Friday
Holi
4
29-Mar-2018
Thursday
Mahavir Jayanti
5
30-Mar-2018
Friday
Good Friday
6
01-May-2018
Tuesday
Maharashtra Day
7
15-Aug-2018
Wednesday
Independence Day
8
22-Aug-2018
Wednesday
Bakri ID
9
13-Sep-2018
Thursday
Ganesh Chaturthi
10
20-Sep-2018
Thursday
Moharram
11
02-Oct-2018
Tuesday
Mahatama Gandhi Jayanti
12
18-Oct-2018
Thursday
Dasera
13
08-Nov-2018
Thursday
Diwali-Balipratipada
14
23-Nov-2018
Friday
Gurunanak Jayanti
15
25-Dec-2018
Tuesday
Christmas

*Muhurat Trading will be conducted. Timings of Muhurat Trading shall be notified subsequently.
Source : NSEindia

Sunday, December 31, 2017

Basics terms of Stock Fundamental Analysis

Share Price=PE X EPS

P/E ratio=
Market Value per Share / Earnings per Share(EPS)

Industrial PE ratio= Average of PE Ratio of all peer Companies

EPS = (Net Income - Dividends on Preferred Stock) / Average Outstanding Shares

Book value of a stock = book value of total assets – total liabilities.

Dividend--A dividend is a distribution of a portion of a company's earnings, decided by the board of directors, to a class of its shareholders.

Return on Equity(ROE) = Net Income/Shareholder's Equity

ROCE = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) / Capital Employee

Revenue-
Revenue is simply the total amount of cash generated by the sale of products or services associated with the company's primary operations.

Net income=Revenue-Total Expenses

Market cap..is it small,medium or large.
Select as per your investment plan.

Volume traded = Intra day traded shares + Inter day traded share.

Deliverables = Inter day traded share.

Deliverables % = (Inter day traded shares/Total volume traded) × 100

Reserves - Balance sheet reserves represent the amount of money insurance companies set aside for future insurance claims or claims that have been filed but not yet reported to the insurance company or settled.

Net worth - Net worth is the amount by which assets exceed liabilities.

Debit - A debit is an accounting entry that results in either an increase in assets or a decrease in liabilities on a company's balance sheet.

Liabilities - A liability is a company's financial debt or obligations that arise during the course of its business operations.

Assets - An asset is a resource with economic value that an individual, corporation or country owns or controls with the expectation that it will provide future benefit.Increasing Value indicates business expansion.

Promoters - A promoter is an individual or organization that helps raise money for some type of investment activity.

Financial Statements - Standalone financial statements show the financial position of the company alone (and no other legal entity).

Consolidated financial statements show the financial position of the company itself along with it’s subsidiary companies, associate companies and joint ventures.

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Tuesday, December 26, 2017

JOURNEY OF SENSEX

JOURNEY OF SENSEX

The Sensex, has been in existence since 1875, is a free-float market-weighted stock market index of 30 well-established and financially sound companies listed on BSE.
Published since 1 January 1986, Sensex is regarded as the pulse of the domestic stock markets in India. The base value of the Sensex is taken as 100 on 1 April 1979,

Here is a timeline on the rise of the Sensex:

100 1 APRIL 1979
1000 July 25, 1990
2000 January 15, 1992
3000 February 29, 1992
4000 March 30, 1992
5000 October 11, 1999
6000 February 11, 2000
7000 June 21, 2005
8000 September 8, 2005
9000 December 5, 2005
10000 February 7, 2006
11000 March 27, 2006
12000 April 20, 2006
13000 October 30, 2006
14000 December 5, 2006
15000 July 6, 2007
16000 September 19, 2007
17000 September 26, 2007
18000 October 9, 2007
19000 October 15, 2007
20000 December 11, 2007
21000 November 5, 2010
22000 March 24, 2014
23000 May 9, 2014
24000 May 13, 2014
25000 May 16, 2014
26000 July 7, 2014
27000 September 2, 2014
28000 Nov 12, 2014
29000 JAN 15, 2015
30000 MARCH 04, 2015
31000 MAY 27, 2017
32000 JULY 13, 2017
33000 OCT 25, 2017
34000 Dec 26, 2017

Saturday, December 2, 2017

Net interest income (NII)

Net interest income (NII) is the difference between the interest income a bank earns from its lending activities and the interest it pays to depositors.

Net interest income = Interest earned - interest paid 

Assuming ABC Bank earned an interest income of Rs 15,000 crore on its assets comprising all kinds of loans, mortgages and securities for the year ended March 31, 2015 and paid Rs 13,750 crore in interest to depositors, the net interest income would be: Net interest income = Rs 15,000 crore - Rs 13,750 crore = Rs 1,250 crore.

 Net interest income can differ from bank to bank due to variations in the composition and quality of assets and interest-bearing funds, change in yields of interest-earning assets and in interest rates paid on liabilities. NIIs of lenders with assets and liabilities bearing variable rates are more vulnerable to change in interest rates. If the spread between rate-sensitive assets (RSAs) and rate-sensitive liabilities (RSLs) increases, a rise in interest rate can make interest income rise more than interest expenses. In such a case, NII also goes up.

On the other hand, when the spread between RSAs and RSLs falls, a rise in interest rate can make interest expenses rise more than interest income, leading to a drop in NII. NII, meanwhile, can also get impacted by any rise or fall in non-performing assets (NPAs). According to the Reserve Bank of India's June edition of financial stability report, NII growth of scheduled commercial banks has been falling over the past couple of years. It stood at 9.3 per cent for FY15 compared with 11.7 per cent for FY14 and 34.6 per cent for FY11.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

REPO RATE

Repo rate is the rate at which the central bank of a country (Reserve Bank of India in case of India) lends money to commercial banks in the event of any shortfall of funds. Repo rate is used by monetary authorities to control inflation.
In the event of inflation, central banks increase repo rate as this acts as a disincentive for banks to borrow from the central bank. This ultimately reduces the money supply in the economy and thus helps in arresting inflation.

The central bank takes the contrary position in the event of a fall in inflationary pressures. Repo and reverse repo rates form a part of the liquidity adjustment facility.

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